Chap 16 Data Handling: Histograms - How does it look like?

Here are 3 examples of HISTOGRAMS



Describe the Histogram - How does it look like?

Post-Lesson Note: Observations (as discussed)

  • Histogram is made up of vertical/column bars (we could not swap the axis)
  • There is no gap between the bars
  • The vertical axis is always "Frequency"
  • The horizontal axis is a series of numbers - either discrete (i.e. 2, 3, 4, ...) or range (of equal class intervals) (i.e. 20<x<=30, 30<x<40).
  • The numbers run in ascending order (they follow a certain order)
  • The graph title is important for us to interpret the information in the histogram

26 comments:

  1. It is similar to a bar chart but there isn't any interval betweens the bar

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  2. 1. There are no spacing in between them.
    2. Frequency is always on the left.

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  3. There is no spacing between the bars.

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  4. The bars are not spaced out as compared to a bar graph.

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  7. The bars of data are arranged in a way that there is no gap between each bar.




    The "Z" can appear on the horizontal axis of the histogram while for bar charts, the "Z" appears on the vertical axis.


    Histograms are used to see the frequency.

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  8. There is always frequency on the vertical axis.

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  9. The graph is written on graph paper, looks like a bar chart but has differences. It has a frequency on the vertical axis. The bars are always vertical.

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  10. The word "frequency" is always at the vertical axis. There are no gaps among the bars.

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  11. Bars on a grid background. No spaces between bars. The bars usually represent frequency. The horizontal axis always start from zero. The bars are always vertical.

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  12. The 'bars' in the chart are side by side and are not separated unlike the bar chart. The histograms all contain frequencies and are all vertical.

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  14. 1. The bars are stuck together unlike bar charts which are separated.
    2. The X-axis is always Frequency

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  15. Histograms seem to compare the frequency of events and the bars have no spaces between them. The two axes start from 0.

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  17. 1. There are no spacings between the bars
    2. The word "frequency" is in all the graphs
    3. The bars are vertical

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  18. It is something like a bar chart however it is stuck together instead of separated.

    The X axis always represents the frequency.

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  19. Histograms are like bar charts, except that it is not spaced out or separated. Frequency is always observed in a histogram, on the vertical axis. The bars in histograms are always vertical, unlike bar graphs, which can be both vertical and horizontal.

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  20. There's no spacing between the bars and the X axis is always the frequency.

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  21. There are no spaces between the bars

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  22. There is always the frequency on the vertical and No. on the horizontal.

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  23. It is like a bar chart but there is no spacing in between the bars,the bars are always vertical, there is a frequency and it is always on the left side going in the vertical direction.

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  24. Each of the bars can represent multiple numbers instead of just one. (x-axis)

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  25. The bar's are closely packed together with no spaces at all.

    The horizontal axis's title is in numerals but it is actually the category of the chart.

    The vertical axis's title are all named frequency where by its the "amount" of the category.

    The two axis's numerals all start from zero.

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  26. There are no spacings
    The horizontal axes starts with 0

    Defination:
    histogram |ˈhɪstəgram|
    noun
    Statistics
    a diagram consisting of rectangles whose area is proportional to the frequency of a variable and whose width is equal to the class interval.

    bar graph (also bar chart)
    noun
    a diagram in which the numerical values of variables are represented by the height or length of lines or rectangles of equal width.
    Definition from theMac Dictionary Version2.1.2

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